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Beckoned Part 1: From London with Love by Aviva Vaughn

This is a must read!

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If you are into the steamy romance, playful flirting and vivid imagery type of story, this is the book for you. Read all the way to the end of this post for information on and the link to enter the GIVEAWAY!

Get your copy on Amazon

London

Synopsis:

Part 1: From London with Love
Fire and ice have nothing on Angela Holguín and fellow MBA student Soren Lund. When they first met at school in the exciting seaside city of Barcelona, Angela was intrigued by the aloof Dane; he was enthralled by the vivacious Californian. But their timing was off and they went their separate ways – until Fate and Destiny put them back in the same city: London. (Scroll for more)
In the British capital, Angela and Soren not only reunite, their desire reignites. This time they are determined not to let love slip through their fingers—despite the many obstacles posed by others. They tumble into one another’s arms and embark upon a passionate journey in the chic, bustling streets of London. But when Angela’s ex shows up, will their new romance be strong enough to persevere? To whom will Angela’s heart beckon?
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About the Author

Aviva Vaughn is a lover of food, travel and books. She has been a voracious reader her whole life finishing Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women when she was five.

She likes to laugh, eat and be intellectually stimulated, preferably at the same time; and enjoys reading and writing about strong, modern characters, no matter what era or planet they are in/on.

She lives in Southern California.

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Brusier/Canelo 

​Woke up yesterday morning to find this beautiful gorgeous male pup on my front lawn. No collar. I think I’ve seen him around the neighborhood but couldn’t tell who he belongs to.

We hung out in my front yard for a few hours before the Dog Pound was called. I became attached and named him Bruiser. My dad was smitten at first sight and named him Canelo. Lol…
I’m now browsing my local dog pound website for him because I want to adopt him… I’ll be glad if I find out that his owner claimed him but honestly, I’ll be even happier if I can adopt him.

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Naming your characters and settings

Nail Your Novel

le moulin 221The three chambers of fluid, lacrimal caruncle, fornix conjunctiva, canal of Schlemm, choroid, ora serrata. Where are these places? Somewhere under the sea?

No, they’re right where you are, indeed where these words are travelling. They are parts of the human eye.

I sense an artistic sensibility in the world of ophthalmic nomenclature, as though its members are preserving a sense of wonder about what these organs do for us. Next door, the brain is another grotto. It has diencephalon, fissure of Rolando, aqueduct of Sylvius, cingulate gyrus. The founding fathers of neurology were blessed with linguistic grace.

In a novel, even if your setting is a known place and realistic, each name you choose creates expectations, hints at themes and the characters’ roles.

Rebecca

Daphne Du Maurier wrote in The Rebecca Diaries how Maxim de Winter was ‘Henry’ in the first draft. She changed it, feeling ‘Henry’ didn’t live…

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How to write dialogue that’s convincing and full of life

Nail Your Novel

life in dialogueI’ve had this interesting email: ‘A literary agent told me my dialogue sounded lifeless and unconvincing and that my characters talked only about plot information. What might be missing? What could I do to improve?’

What’s good dialogue?

First of all, although dialogue is one of the ways we can unfold the story, it’s more than an exposition vehicle. Note that word ‘lifeless’ in the agent’s assessment: good dialogue brings a quality of real experience. It lets the reader eavesdrop on people who are experiencing the story first hand. Even in a first-person narrative, we need dialogue from other characters or the world may seem less vivid.

(Of course, you might do this deliberately, perhaps to create a highly coloured or unreliable view of the world. But usually even a first-person narrative will let the other characters speak for themselves.)

However, characters obviously must talk about what’s happening – who…

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